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Keynote Lectures

Computer Supported Education - The Human Factor
José Carlos Lourenço Quadrado, ISEL - Lisbon Superior Engineering Institute, Portugal and IFEES - International Federation of Engineering Education Societies, United States

Digital Age Learning - The Changing Face of Online Education
Steve Wheeler, Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University, United Kingdom

Mathematics Teaching - Is the Future Syncretic?
Larissa Fradkin, London South Bank University, Brunel University and Sound Mathematics Ltd., United Kingdom

Team Learning in Engineering Education
Erik de Graaff, Aalborg University, Denmark

 

Computer Supported Education - The Human Factor

José Carlos Lourenço Quadrado
ISEL - Lisbon Superior Engineering Institute, Portugal and IFEES - International Federation of Engineering Education Societies
United States
 

Brief Bio

José Carlos Quadrado is the full professor with tenure of electrical machines in the electrical engineering and automation department of the Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa (ISEL), Portugal.

Currently he holds the position of President of ISEL since 2006.

He has a BSc in Energy and Power Systems, a diploma degree in Electrical Engineering, Automation and Industrial Electronics from ISEL, a MSc and a Doctor degree in Electrical Engineering and Computers from Lisbon Technical University. He also holds the Habilitation degree (Aggregation) in Electrical Engineering from Beira Interior University.

Holds the position of President of the International Federation of Engineering Education Societies (IFEES) and the position of immediate-past president of the Ibero-American Engineering Education Association (ASIBEI), and he is also the immediate past vice-President of the European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI). Former member of the National Bologna Expert Group, he leads the Portuguese Observatory on European and Latin-American University management strategy best practices and the national association of engineering rectors and deans.

Being a member and senior member of several engineering societies and engineering education societies in several continents, he is also a visiting professor in several universities around the world and board member of technological societies.

He holds over 100 international publications (including journals and chapters of books), several patents and some international technical prizes and scholarships, and also held the position of editor and editor-in-chief in some journals. Up to now he has also developed several international engineering projects in the fields of renewable energy, fuel cells, electrical vehicles and intelligent control.


Abstract
Within the Computer Supported Education (CSE) there are three interesting trends observed.
 
The first one is the conscience that the technical specialisms are becoming increasingly important. New technologies and the emergence of Mobile, Cloud, Continuous Integration & Deployment allow educators with practical hands-on knowledge and experience to be decisive for the success of CSE projects.
 
On the other hand, it has changed the way we work together with each other. The necessity to have agile replies to the demands of the education stakeholders, to communicate and take responsibility, demands the critical thinking, the exchange of information and the flexibility being more and more the decisive success factors. These stakeholders are increasing creating a CSE team that consists of individuals more than ever with their own specialty and own drivers.
 
In addition, the time-to-market of the technology is getting shorter and is strongly dependent on the costs in the current economic climate.
 
All three trends converge to the manager. As a result, it is noticeable that you have to demonstrate the added value of your part in the CSE team, you must make results visible and under high pressure. How do you do that? Why is man such an important factor? What do you do with the man in your team? How do you put people in their strength and you create a work environment in which everyone comes into its own?



 

 

Digital Age Learning - The Changing Face of Online Education

Steve Wheeler
Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Steve Wheeler is Associate Professor of Learning Technologies at Plymouth University, in South West England. Originally trained as a psychologist, he has spent his entire career working in media, technology and learning, predominantly in nurse education (NHS 1981-1995) and teacher education (1976-1981 and 1995-present). He is now in the School of Education, at the Faculty of Health, Education and Society.

Steve teaches on a number of undergraduate and post-graduate teacher education programmes in the UK and overseas. He researches into e-learning and distance education, with particular emphasis on the pedagogy underlying the use of social media and Web 2.0 tools, and he also has research interests in mobile learning and cyber-cultures. Steve is regularly invited to speak about his work and has given keynotes and invited lectures to audiences in 30 countries across 5 continents. He is currently involved in several research programmes related to e-learning, social media and handheld technologies.

Steve is the author of more than 150 scholarly articles, with over 2500 academic citations and is an active and prolific edublogger. His blog Learning with ‘e’s is a regular online commentary on the social and cultural impact of disruptive technologies, and the application of digital media in education and training. It currently attracts in excess of 150,000 views each month.

Steve is chair of the Plymouth e-Learning Conference, and between 2008-2011 was also co-editor of the journal Interactive Learning Environments. He serves on the editorial boards of a number of learning technology and education related open access academic journals including Research in Learning Technology (formerly ALT-J), the International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning (IRRODL), the European Journal of Open, Distance and eLearning (EURODL) and Digital Culture and Education. He has served on the organising and executive committees of a number of international academic conferences, including ALT-C, ICL, EDEN, IFIP and AICT.

In 2008 Steve was awarded a Fellowship by the European Distance and E-learning Network (EDEN), and in 2011 he was elected to serve as a member of the Steering group of EDEN’s Network of Academics and Professionals (NAP). Between 2008-2013 he also served as chair of the influential worldwide research group IFIP Technical Committee Working Group 3.6 (distance education) and is author of several books including The Digital Classroom (Routledge: 2008) and Connected Minds, Emerging Cultures (Information Age: 2009). He lives in Plymouth, on the South West coast of England.


Abstract
Online education was once quite simple. Content delivery was controlled by the experts through Learning Management Systems, and discussions were conducted via e-mail and bulletin boards. Then came the advent of Web 2.0 and social media and things changed, boundaries blurred and the pace of change accelerated. In today’s digital age, are Learning Management Systems still required, and is e-mail now increasingly anachronistic? Students now connect on social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter and converse through mobile text. They generate their own content on a regular basis and act as the nodes of their own production. Increasingly informal collaborating comes naturally through the new tools and technologies that constitute their personal learning environments. Add to this mix the meteoric success of Massive Online Open Courses and Flipped Classrooms, the popularity of online social games and prospect of new, emerging technologies such as augmented reality and wearable systems, and we begin to question the future of our current online educational provision. What will the next few years hold for online education? What will be the new reality for learning, knowledge and ultimately, human intelligence? Are learner expectations unfulfilled by the current provision of traditional educational institutions? How much will the roles of teachers be required to change? What new theories and practices will we need to develop to stay relevant in an increasingly technological world where the learner is taking control? In this presentation I will address all of the above questions and offer my personal views on the future of online education in the digital age.



 

 

Mathematics Teaching - Is the Future Syncretic?

Larissa Fradkin
London South Bank University, Brunel University and Sound Mathematics Ltd.
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Larissa Fradkin is Emerita Professor, London South Bank University, UK and Associated Professor, Brunel University, UK.  Trained as a physicist at St Petersburg University, Russia, from 1974 till 1977 she studied for her PhD in Applied Mathematics at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  From 1978 till 1984 she was employed as a Research Scientist at the NZ Department of Scientific and Industrial Research and from 1985 till 1992, as a Research Associate at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics of Cambridge University, UK.   From 1993 till 2009 Larissa was a member of academic staff at London South Bank University where she created and ran a Research Group on Mathematical Modelling of Ultrasonic NDE (Non-Destructive Evaluation of industrial components and materials) and teaching mathematics on various engineering courses.  She is now a Managing Director of an independent research organisation Sound Mathematics Ltd., working on her ultrasonic projects, mainly in collaboration with CEA (the French Atomic Commission) and promoting sound mathematics education of engineers.  Larissa is a Fellow of IMA (UK Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications), IOP (UK Institute of Physics) and IET (UK Institute of Engineering and Technology).  Larisa has authored and co-authored over a 100 scientific and scholarly publications, lately on pedagogy behind her system of maths teaching and in 2013 Bookboon has published her open access e-textbook “College Algebra and Calculus:  The Whys and Hows.”  Larissa has been a member of organising committees of several international engineering conferences and is currently a UK National contact person for SEFI’s Maths Working Group (SEFI is the European Society for Engineering Education) and a member of the Committee on Mathematical Education for Engineers, iNEER (International Network for Engineering Education and Research).

Larissa lives in Cambridge, England.


Abstract
Teaching is one of the oldest professions on Earth and mathematics teaching must have had come first, since it appears that numbers had been invented before letters!  Yet “mathematics wars” have been raging throughout the XX century, and technology has only added fuel to fire:  should mathematics be taught as poetry, requiring an inordinate amount of memorising and practising or should teachers concentrate on abstract concepts, with the tedium of calculations left to calculators and computers?  Can ordinary learners grasp abstract concepts at all?  On top of that,  a modern University maths teacher teaching STEM students, particularly, future engineers has to cope with large classes, much larger than most European teachers had to deal with in the past.  Can any of the teaching approaches be implemented in such environment in an effective manner?  The advent of the XXI century saw mathematics teachers cajoled into employing the “evidence-based” technological solutions that had been shown to work when training University administrators, business managers or technicians.  Many resisted, arguing that maths learning is a different process to learning a few words and procedures. Now it is all about Massive Online Open Courses and Flipped Classrooms.  Can ordinary engineering students learn mathematics by watching MIT or Khan Academy videos?  Can ordinary mathematics teachers facilitate the process by “flipping” in an effective way? I will present my thoughts on the subject, argue against false dichotomies and suggest syncretic solutions, including the ones that rely on cognitive technologies of the future.



 

 

Team Learning in Engineering Education

Erik de Graaff
Aalborg University
Denmark
 

Brief Bio
Erik de Graaff is trained as psychologist and holds a PhD in social sciences. He has been working with Problem Based learning (PBL) in Maastricht from 1979 till 1990. In 1994 he was appointed as associate professor in the field of educational innovation at the Faculty of Technology Policy and Management of Delft University of Technology. Dr. de Graaff has been a visiting professor at the University of Newcastle, Australia in 1995 and a guest professor at Aalborg University in Denmark. The collaboration with Aalborg University led to an appointment as full professor at the department of Development and Planning in 2011. Dr. de Graaff is recognized as an international expert on PBL. He contributed to the promotion of knowledge and understanding of higher engineering education with numerous publications and through active participation in professional organizations like SEFI, IGIP, IFEES and ALE. He has published over 200 articles and papers and he has presented more than 70 keynotes and invited lectures on various topics related to PBL in higher education, like: Working with PBL, Management of change, Assessment and evaluation, Methods of applied research and Collaboration between university and industry. Since January 2008 he is Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Engineering Education.


Abstract
Most engineers work in teams during their professional life. Hence, learning to be an effective team member is an essential aspect of preparing for engineering practice. This presentation will analyse how Problem Based Learning (PBL) supports students in engineering in developing teamwork skills, like leadership, communication skills, and the ability to correctly assess your own contribution to the teamwork. Several tools that support this process will be discussed.



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