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Keynote Lectures

When the Sharing Economy, IT and Education Collide
Glenn Wintrich, Dell, United States

How to Teach Humans (with Machines)
Rob Koper, Open University of the Netherlands, Netherlands

Digital Technology and Higher Education - Delivering Benefits for Student Education
Neil Morris, University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Open Education Practices as Answer to New Demands of Training in Entrepreneurship Competences
Edmundo Tovar, Madrid Polytechnic University, Spain


 

When the Sharing Economy, IT and Education Collide

Glenn Wintrich
Dell
United States
 

Brief Bio

Glenn Wintrich has more than 40 years of international delivery, marketing, service line management and innovation experience. In early 2006 Glenn joined Perot systems as the Enterprise Network Service Line Manager and progressed to the Global Director of Information Systems Product Management.  Currently, Glenn leads numerous innovation initiatives within Dell Services Chief Innovation Office. Glenn is currently conducting smart cities research with six European Union universities and has responsibility for European-wide innovation activities for Dell and our customers.  His research focuses on the development of reference architectures to integrate and optimize disparate city functions; the application of technology enabled smart city business models; and utilizing technology to help monetize sustainability initiatives. Additionally, Glenn is a guest lecturer in both Europe and the United States on innovation, education, and business management.

Glenn currently chairs the Collin College Business Advisory Council, representing 22 colleges across the United States, for technology curriculum.  He is currently a business council advisor for the National Science Foundation.  Glenn is also on the board of director for Interlink, a non-profit organization with the goal of matching high school and college educations to meet the market demand for job ready employees.



Abstract
The 21st century has already brought about amazing changes. We are entering an era of open source, global collaboration and entrepreneurialism. We live in a world where there is no shortage of good ideas tied to amazing stories of skyrocketing successes.  Size, scale, secrecy and mountains of capital are the prerequisites of the past.  With the help of IT by the drink, global supply chains awaiting your orders, crowdsourcing and the Internet to globalize your business, startups can rapidly become global billion dollar successes.
Education institutions across the world are recognizing the parallels between startups such as Zipcar, AirBnB, and Innocentive and the potential education practices of tomorrow. Each company was founded on great ideas and an innovative business models that were brought to life by cutting edge IT solutions. This keynote will highlight the possibilities that IT can enable; the viable educational shifts and case studies were the sharing economy, IT and education collided. This collision has resulted in the genesis of new approaches, reach and value for both the universities and their students.



 

 

How to Teach Humans (with Machines)

Rob Koper
Open University of the Netherlands
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio

Rob Koper is appointed as University Professor at the Institutes Board with a specific focus on the innovation of (higher) education. Before this appointment he was the Dean of the Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies  (celstec.org). In his personal research he is interested the social and cognitive aspects of human learning, the effective use of ICTs to support human learning and the improvement of educational institutions to facilitate better teaching and learning. He has written more than four hundred scientific contributions in journals and books, and has developed many different ICT systems to support learning and teaching.


Abstract
In our field we are building digital devices (‘machines’) to enable people to learn better or faster. These machines include mobile devices, computers, robots, ambient technologies, embedded systems (e.g. in cars), games, etc. An often neglected question is how you actually take care that these machines are indeed influencing the learning processes of humans in an effective way. In this keynote I will address this issue by discussing underlying cognitive learning processes and the way that machines can influence these. I will identify and present five different types of human learning processes that each need a different teaching approach. To influence these five processes, I have defined for each of them a Human Learning Interface, i.e. a protocol that can be used to design effective teaching machines. To conclude the keynote I will provide some good and bad practices related to the use of these interfaces.



 

 

Digital Technology and Higher Education - Delivering Benefits for Student Education

Neil Morris
University of Leeds
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio

Professor Neil Morris is Chair of Educational Technology, Innovation and Change in the School of Education and the Director of Digital Learning at the University of Leeds, reporting directly to the Pro-Vice Chancellor for Student Education.  He is a National Teaching Fellow, and has won a number of national awards for teaching excellence. Neil has a research background in neuroscience and current research interests in educational technology, online learning and blended learning.He has conducted a number of published research studies on the impact of mobile technologies on student learning and engagement and he is the co-author of Study Skills Connected, a successful textbook on using technology effectively to enhance learning (Palgrave MacMillan). Neil has led a number of strategic technology projects at Leeds, including MOOCs for FutureLearn, lecture capture, Open Educational Resources, Virtual Learning Environment and student response handsets. In his current role, Neil has strategic and operational responsibility for the Digital Learning Team which is responsible for the University's iTunesU site and delivering MOOCs for the FutureLearn platform. Neil has authored a number of strategies and policies for the University, including the Digital Strategy for Taught Student Education, the Blended Learning Strategy, the Audio and Video Recording policy, the MOOC vision and strategy and the Open Educational Resources policy. Neil has given keynote talks at UK and international events, and is a regular speaker at conferences.


Abstract
In this keynote session, I will explore some of the institutional, pedagogic and individual factors that face educators embracing digital technologies to support students’ learning in Higher Education, informal and lifelong learning settings. I will draw on experiences from implementing large scale lecture capture technology at institutional level, leading a Massive Open Online Course program at Leeds, and developing and implementing strategies and policies for digital learning.  I will consider how we can effectively and appropriately increase the use of digital technology to enhance students learning.



 

 

Open Education Practices as Answer to New Demands of Training in Entrepreneurship Competences

Edmundo Tovar
Madrid Polytechnic University
Spain
 

Brief Bio
Edmundo Tovar (M’94–SM’06) received the computer engineering degree and Ph.D. degree in informatics from the Madrid Technical University (Universidad Polite´cnica de Madrid, UPM), Madrid, Spain, in 1986 and 1994, respectively. He is currently with the UPM as a Professor of information technology in enterprise with the Languages and Information Systems Department, and a leader of an Innovation Group in Educa- tion in the UPM focused in the application of Web technologies to OpenCourseware and OER. He has been participating in different European projects about OER. He has served as an elected member of the Board of Directors of the OpenCourseWare Consortium (2009–2013), Executive Director of the OCW Office of the UPM (2008–2012), and currently Executive Director of the Open Education Office at UPM. Prof. Tovar is a member of the IEEE Education Society Board of Governors (2005–2012) and Vice President of Educational Activities and Awards (2013–2014). He is a member on behalf of the Education Society of the University Resources Committee of the IEEE Educational Activities Board. He is a Certified Software Development Professional (CSDP) of the IEEE Computer Society (2005 to date). He is on the Steering Committee of the IEEE EDUCON and the IEEE Frontiers in Education (FIE) Conference (International and Europe Chair, 2008 to date) and is a program and planning committee member, reviewer, and chairman of several others. He is Co-Chair of FIE 2014, organized in Madrid, Spain, by the IEEE and the ASEE. He was awarded the IEEE EDUCON 2011 Meritorious Service Award (jointly with Manuel Castro) of the EDUCON 2011 conference; the 2008 Distinguished Chapter Leadership Award of the IEEE Education Society, and the 2011 Best Chapter Award (by the IEEE Region 8) and the 2007 Chapter Achievement Award (by the IEEE Education Society) for collective work in the Spanish Chapter of the IEEE Education Society. He received the award for Educational Innovation of the UPM in 2007.


Abstract
Open education encompasses resources, tools and practices that employ a framework of open sharing to improve educational access and effectiveness worldwide. Although the idea of free and open sharing in education is not new, the power of the internet allows a rapid advantage of a rapid free dissemination and enabling rapid people around the world to access knowledge, connect and collaborate. Researchers can share data and develop new networks. Educators can find new ways to help students learn. People can connect with others they wouldn’t otherwise meet to share information and ideas. Materials can be translated, mixed together, broken apart and openly shared again, increasing access and allowing new approaches.
Competences related to entrepreneurship are considered a key factor to put in place in this period of economic recession and is, by this reason, a challenge to the Open Education: to allow educators, students and self-learners to acquire competences for employability by developing and analyzing an innovative approach.
This keynote session shows an example how an approach based on Open Educational Resources (OER) can acquire a strong potential impact on some of this sensitive problem. This is an opportunity also to review the problems have to be managed, as discoverability and quality  of resources.



 



 


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