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Keynote Lectures

Impact of Artificial Intelligence and Automation on the Future of Education
Liz Bacon, University of Greenwich, United Kingdom

Available Soon
Hamadou Saliah-Hassane, TÉLUQ University, Canada

Technology-Enhanced Informal Learning: Bringing Advanced Learning Technologies into Museums and Out-of-School Settings
H. Chad Lane, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, United States

 

Impact of Artificial Intelligence and Automation on the Future of Education

Liz Bacon
University of Greenwich
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Professor Liz Bacon BSc, PhD, CEng, CSci, CITP, FBCS, PFHEA, MACM is a Deputy Pro-Vice-Chancellor at the University of Greenwich in London, with a University wide remit leading the development of technology enhanced learning. She was President of BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, in the year 14-15 and is a past Chair of the BCS Academy of Computing, and the CPHC (Council of Professors and Heads of Computing) national committee. Liz is a Professor of Software Engineering with over a hundred publications and a Co-Director of the eCentre research group. She is an experienced journal and conference reviewer, editorial board member, and PhD supervisor, and has been involved in several EU research projects, including being Principal Investigator and Project Coordinator for two EU FP7 projects in the past four years. She is an experienced systems designer and developer and her research interests include computing policy, smart systems, security and technology enhanced learning (TEL). Within TEL, she has applied her research in software engineering, artificial intelligence and security to a range of application areas such as crisis management and eHealth, focussing on: smart games-based learning environments; metacognition and learning strategies; and adaptable, adaptive and personalised systems. Liz has been involved in many professional activities during her career which include working with e-skills UK, the Science Council, Parliamentary IT Committee (PITCOM), EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education), the National HE STEM programme, EKKA (Estonian Quality Assurance Agency), and the University of Cambridge as an ICT Thought Leader for their International Examinations. She also researches, publishes, and is a regular international speaker, on the supply and demand of e-skills to the IT industry. Liz is passionate about the development of her discipline and keen to inspire more people to choose computing as a career, particularly women. During her BCS Presidential year she set up a senior women´s network in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths), called STELLAR (bcs.org/stellar) which works to encourage more women to enter STEM professions.


Abstract
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has already become pervasive in society however, our approaches to teaching and learning have to-date, remained relatively untouched by it. As AI advances along the human intelligence spectrum this will not be the case for much longer. This keynote will examine the impact of AI on society, jobs and hence future learning needs, discussing the potential directions, uses, dangers and the likely impact on staff, students, institutions, funding models and pedagogy.



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Hamadou Saliah-Hassane
TÉLUQ University
Canada
 

Brief Bio

Professor Saliah-Hassane earned a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from McGill University in Montreal and a Bachelor and Master of Applied Science degree from École Polytechnique de Montréal, Canada. He is currently teaching Informatics and Computer Networks and Security at TELUQ University in Montreal. He is a senior researcher at TELUQ where he is carrying research on Intelligent Distributed Systems including Smart Networked Educational Devices for Online laboratories.

Professor Saliah-Hassane is member of Professional Engineers of Québec (OIQ); of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE); of African Engineering Education Association (AEEA); of Board of Governors of IEEE Education Society (2007 -2013 & 2014-2017) and Chair of its Standards Committee) and the Chair of the P1876™ IEEE Standards Association’s Working Group on “Standard on Networked Smart Learning Objects for Online Laboratories”. He is also member of IEEE Learning Technology Standards Committee and  member of IEEE Transactions on Learning Technology Steering Committee;

In 2005 Professor Saliah-Hassane received the "2005 Achievement Award" from the International Network for Engineering Education (iNEER) for “Research and Innovation on Online laboratories and for the Advancement of International Collaboration”. Hamadou Saliah-Hassane is one of the founding members of the Global Online Laboratory Consortium called GOLC (2009). In 2012, Professor Saliah-Hassane was recognised with highest academic distinction of “Commander of the Order of Academic Palm” by Republic of Niger, his home country.


Abstract
Available Soon



 

 

Technology-Enhanced Informal Learning: Bringing Advanced Learning Technologies into Museums and Out-of-School Settings

H. Chad Lane
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
United States
 

Brief Bio

H. Chad Lane is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and Informatics at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA. Prof. Lane's research focuses on the design, use, and impacts of intelligent technologies for learning and behavior change. This work involves blending techniques from the entertainment industry (that foster engagement) with those from artificial intelligence and intelligent tutoring systems (that promote learning), as well as running studies to better understand whether and how the resulting learning experiences impact learners. He has led design-based research projects involving educational games, intelligent tutoring systems, and immersive technologies. His current work focuses on the uses of game and sensing technologies for science learning in informal learning contexts. Prior to joining UIUC in early 2015, he was Director of Learning Sciences Research at the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies where he led highly interdisciplinary efforts to build and evaluate a variety of educational technologies covering wide-ranging topics such as science learning, intercultural competence, gardening/cooking, computer programming, and motivational interviewing. He has over 60 publications, delivered invited talks around the U.S and Europe, and has hands-on experiences in informal and formal learning contexts. He was director of the Joseph Baldwin Academy from 1996-1998, an academic summer camp for kids in Missouri, and earned his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Pittsburgh in 2004. There, he conducted his doctoral research on intelligent learning technologies for problem understanding and solving skills in the Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC).


Abstract
Although many of the most notable advances in Technology-Enhanced Learning research focus on formal learning, increasingly more attention is being paid to the role of advanced learning technologies in informal contexts, such as summer camps, after school programs, museums, and science centers. In this talk, I will discuss the broad goals of informal learning practices and research, and argue that a shift from formal settings to informal has profound implications for the design of educational technologies. For example, when a learner has complete “veto” power over a learning experience, learning technologies cannot assume that sufficient levels of motivation exist in the learner. They must earn that continued attention from the learner. This positions emotions as central to the learning experience, and suggests technologies must assume simultaneous roles to both promote learning and engagement. I will present two research efforts that seek to address this challenge: the first – completed when I was at the University of Southern California – focused on the use of pedagogical agents to teach basic computing literacy (at the Boston Museum of Science), and the second (ongoing) leverages the popular game Minecraft to trigger interest and learning in Astronomy. My talk will conclude with suggestions for new roles of advanced learning technologies in informal settings, with an emphasis on the increasingly blurred lines between formal and informal learning.



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