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Previous Invited Speakers

The researchers below were distinguished invited keynotes at previous CSEDU conferences.
We are indebted to them for their contribution to heighten the conference level.

2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS INDEX

2014
Computer Supported Education - The Human Factor
          José Carlos Lourenço Quadrado, ISEL - Lisbon Superior Engineering Institute, Portugal and IFEES - International Federation of Engineering Education Societies, United States
Digital Age Learning - The Changing Face of Online Education
          Steve Wheeler, Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University, United Kingdom
Mathematics Teaching - Is the Future Syncretic?
          Larissa Fradkin, London South Bank University, Brunel University and Sound Mathematics Ltd., United Kingdom
Team Learning in Engineering Education
          Erik de Graaff, Aalborg University, Denmark

2013
The Educational Software Gold Rush - How the Learning Sciences and Advanced Technology Can Lead the Way
          Bruce McLaren, Carnegie Mellon University, United States, Germany
New Challenges in Engineering Education
          Michael E. Auer, Carinthia Tech Institute, Austria
What Is: Pedagogy, Education, Intelligence, Knowledge, Learning, Teaching, Information, Etc. and Why Do We Care about What They Are, and How Do They Interact?
          Rob Reilly, MIT, United States
Tech-Savvy Students? Maybe Not …
          Susan Zvacek, Fort Hays State University, United States

2012
CREATIVE INQUIRY AND IMMERSIVE LEARNING
          Joseph Trimmer, Ball State University, United States
ENHANCING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT IN E-LEARNING - A Theoretical Perspective
          David Kaufman, Simon Fraser University, Canada
INSTITUTIONAL PERSONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS – Paradise or Paradox?
          Hugh C. Davis, University of Southampton, United Kingdom

2011
CLOUD COMPUTING IN EDUCATION - The Intersection of Challenges and Opportunities
          Ivan Ivanov, SUNY Empire State College, United States
COMPUTER EDUCATION JOURNALS - Leading or Following Research Trends
          Rachelle Heller, The George Washington University, United States
WHY, WHAT AND HOW ARE WE DOING OUR RESEARCH?
          Lauri Malmi, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Finland
AUGMENTED KNOWLEDGE COMMUNICATION SPACES
          Friedrich Hesse, Knowledge Media Research Center, Germany

2010
DESKTOP TO LAPTOP TO CLOUD - Challenges for Teaching and for Administration
          Michael Gould, ESRI, United States
COMPUTATIONAL THINKING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM - The Power and the Peril
          Robert M. Panoff, The Shodor Education Foundation, United States
"HOW MUCH TECHNOLOGY?" IS THE QUESTION
          Hermann Maurer, Graz University of Technology, Austria

2009
LEARNING ISSUES IN OPEN-ENDED GROUP PROJECTS
          Mats Daniels, Uppsala University, Sweden
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND EDUCATIONAL EMPOWERMENT - A Humanistic Perspective
          Thao Le, University of Tasmania, Australia
NEW FRONTIERS IN COMPUTER SUPPORTED EDUCATION
          Itiel Dror, University College London, United Kingdom
QUALITY POLICIES CONFORMED WITH ABET IN A SPANISH ENGINEERING SCHOOL
          Edmundo Tovar, Madrid Polytechnic University, Spain
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES SUPPORTING LEARNING
          Manuel Castro Gil, National University for Distance Education, Spain
HOMO ZAPPIENS, LEARNING IN A DIGITAL AGE
          Wim Veen, Delft University of Technology, Netherlands


2014

Computer Supported Education - The Human Factor



José Carlos Lourenço Quadrado
ISEL - Lisbon Superior Engineering Institute, Portugal and IFEES - International Federation of Engineering Education Societies
United States


Within the Computer Supported Education (CSE) there are three interesting trends observed.
 
The first one is the conscience that the technical specialisms are becoming increasingly important. New technologies and the emergence of Mobile, Cloud, Continuous Integration & Deployment allow educators with practical hands-on knowledge and experience to be decisive for the success of CSE projects.
 
On the other hand, it has changed the way we work together with each other. The necessity to have agile replies to the demands of the education stakeholders, to communicate and take responsibility, demands the critical thinking, the exchange of information and the flexibility being more and more the decisive success factors. These stakeholders are increasing creating a CSE team that consists of individuals more than ever with their own specialty and own drivers.
 
In addition, the time-to-market of the technology is getting shorter and is strongly dependent on the costs in the current economic climate.
 
All three trends converge to the manager. As a result, it is noticeable that you have to demonstrate the added value of your part in the CSE team, you must make results visible and under high pressure. How do you do that? Why is man such an important factor? What do you do with the man in your team? How do you put people in their strength and you create a work environment in which everyone comes into its own?





Digital Age Learning - The Changing Face of Online Education



Steve Wheeler
Plymouth Institute of Education, Plymouth University
United Kingdom
http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/swheeler


Online education was once quite simple. Content delivery was controlled by the experts through Learning Management Systems, and discussions were conducted via e-mail and bulletin boards. Then came the advent of Web 2.0 and social media and things changed, boundaries blurred and the pace of change accelerated. In today’s digital age, are Learning Management Systems still required, and is e-mail now increasingly anachronistic? Students now connect on social media tools such as Facebook and Twitter and converse through mobile text. They generate their own content on a regular basis and act as the nodes of their own production. Increasingly informal collaborating comes naturally through the new tools and technologies that constitute their personal learning environments. Add to this mix the meteoric success of Massive Online Open Courses and Flipped Classrooms, the popularity of online social games and prospect of new, emerging technologies such as augmented reality and wearable systems, and we begin to question the future of our current online educational provision. What will the next few years hold for online education? What will be the new reality for learning, knowledge and ultimately, human intelligence? Are learner expectations unfulfilled by the current provision of traditional educational institutions? How much will the roles of teachers be required to change? What new theories and practices will we need to develop to stay relevant in an increasingly technological world where the learner is taking control? In this presentation I will address all of the above questions and offer my personal views on the future of online education in the digital age.





Mathematics Teaching - Is the Future Syncretic?



Larissa Fradkin
London South Bank University, Brunel University and Sound Mathematics Ltd.
United Kingdom


Teaching is one of the oldest professions on Earth and mathematics teaching must have had come first, since it appears that numbers had been invented before letters!  Yet “mathematics wars” have been raging throughout the XX century, and technology has only added fuel to fire:  should mathematics be taught as poetry, requiring an inordinate amount of memorising and practising or should teachers concentrate on abstract concepts, with the tedium of calculations left to calculators and computers?  Can ordinary learners grasp abstract concepts at all?  On top of that,  a modern University maths teacher teaching STEM students, particularly, future engineers has to cope with large classes, much larger than most European teachers had to deal with in the past.  Can any of the teaching approaches be implemented in such environment in an effective manner?  The advent of the XXI century saw mathematics teachers cajoled into employing the “evidence-based” technological solutions that had been shown to work when training University administrators, business managers or technicians.  Many resisted, arguing that maths learning is a different process to learning a few words and procedures. Now it is all about Massive Online Open Courses and Flipped Classrooms.  Can ordinary engineering students learn mathematics by watching MIT or Khan Academy videos?  Can ordinary mathematics teachers facilitate the process by “flipping” in an effective way? I will present my thoughts on the subject, argue against false dichotomies and suggest syncretic solutions, including the ones that rely on cognitive technologies of the future.





Team Learning in Engineering Education



Erik de Graaff
Aalborg University
Denmark


Most engineers work in teams during their professional life. Hence, learning to be an effective team member is an essential aspect of preparing for engineering practice. This presentation will analyse how Problem Based Learning (PBL) supports students in engineering in developing teamwork skills, like leadership, communication skills, and the ability to correctly assess your own contribution to the teamwork. Several tools that support this process will be discussed.





2013

The Educational Software Gold Rush - How the Learning Sciences and Advanced Technology Can Lead the Way



Bruce McLaren
Carnegie Mellon University, United States
Germany
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~bmclaren


In today's world, young people are immersed in technology and thus expect it to play a key role in their education. In tune with this trend, there has been a proliferation of internet-based learning software, educational games, and instructional technology, such as Cognitive Tutors (www.carnegielearning.com), Study Island (www.studyisland.com), BrainPop (www.brainpop.com), Civilization (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilization_IV) and the Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org). Many schools provide their students with tablet computers so they can access this ever-widening variety of online learning software. Yet, in the midst of this "gold rush" toward educational software, are we on a firm foundation?  Important questions emerge: Can the Learning Sciences and advanced technology – most specifically artificial intelligence – lead us on a path toward the “gold”? What still needs to be done to "mine the gold" of educational technology?  In this talk I will discuss how science and technology have and are coming together to support the educational software gold rush. Together, the Learning Sciences and advanced technology, I conjecture, can lead the way toward the design and development of the best possible learning environments for 21st century students.   





New Challenges in Engineering Education



Michael E. Auer
Carinthia Tech Institute
Austria


Never has the speed of development in the area of engineering been as accelerated as it is today, as we observe the enormous and driven growth of the area of engineering. Today's tendencies require concerted new efforts in engineering education - or in other words, the importance of pedagogy in the field of engineering is growing enormously.

These changes strongly demand new didactic and pedagogic paradigms.

It is important to consider that humankind has never faced such a rapidly changing and dynamic global environment which requires so much of engineers as we are witnessing today. Never before have the challenges in education and pedagogy been as challenging as today. Never has so much been demanded of engineers.

Starting from actual tendencies in education the talk will highlight new requirements in engineering education.




What Is: Pedagogy, Education, Intelligence, Knowledge, Learning, Teaching, Information, Etc. and Why Do We Care about What They Are, and How Do They Interact?



Rob Reilly
MIT
United States
http://www.media.mit.edu/~reilly


As educators we are familiar with terms such as: education, learning, knowledge, wisdom, information, teaching, intelligence. These concepts are all important to us; but it seems that their meaning, how they are applied, and how we interpret them in light of evolving pedagogy is quickly evolving. Understanding these terms and understanding how they fit-into a model for delivering 'education' for a model based knowledge domain (e.g., science, engineering) is critically important. This presentation will shed some light on the definitions of terms that we use in 'education' and will provide an understanding how these various concepts (e.g., information, intelligence, learning, wisdom) fit into a model for effectively delivering content from a model-based knowledge domain.




Tech-Savvy Students? Maybe Not …



Susan Zvacek
Fort Hays State University
United States


It’s easy to assume that our students are technologically adept and ready to take advantage of the many resources available online. Unfortunately, recent research suggests that growing up in a tech-enriched environment does not result in the ability to use digital tools effectively. Instead, many young people lack important conceptual and intellectual capabilities that would allow them to understand, apply, and evaluate online content. This presentation will address the skills that contribute to technological literacy, popular myths related to “digital natives,” and how we can help our students become critical consumers and users of digital tools and resources.





2012

CREATIVE INQUIRY AND IMMERSIVE LEARNING



Joseph Trimmer
Ball State University
United States
vbc@bsu.edu


The leaders in higher education are increasingly interested in the connection between creativity and technology. In particular, they are interested in designing an educational culture that will encourage students to develop and display their creativity, and providing various forms of emerging technology to enrich their creative processes. Over the past 12 years, The Virginia Ball Center for Creative Inquiry—at Ball State University—had explored these issues through a series of interdisciplinary, project driven, community based, immersive learning seminars. This presentation will explain the strategies that have shaped these seminars and provide award-winning examples of the products students have created in these seminars.




ENHANCING STUDENT ENGAGEMENT IN E-LEARNING - A Theoretical Perspective



David Kaufman
Simon Fraser University
Canada
http://www.educ.sfu.ca/profiles/?page_id=177


In the past few years, there has been criticism of e-learning practices and a renewed interest in enhancing students’ engagement in this form of education. Engagement typically refers to providing student activities that involve active cognitive processes such as creating, problem-solving, reasoning, decision-making, and evaluation. Due to the meaningful nature of the learning environment and activities, students are intrinsically motivated to learn. In this presentation, I will discuss various theoretical perspectives, research evidence and multiple practices that support engagement and the consequent improvement in student learning. The characteristics of ‘net generation’ students will be reviewed and several examples given of online activities to engage them, based on each of these characteristics. I will close with a description of the skills needed by the 21st century instructor and provide suggestions and resources for acquiring these.




INSTITUTIONAL PERSONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS – Paradise or Paradox?



Hugh  C. Davis
University of Southampton
United Kingdom
http://users.ecs.soton.ac.uk/hcd


Traditionally learning has been seen as a solitary and individualistic task; learning has been represented as committing knowledge to memory and the personal acquisition of skills and literacies. The affordances of early computer technologies amplified this perspective, and transitions of learning technologies to networked platforms sustained the individualist context within the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). However constructivist critiques of learning environments have emphasised the value and importance of social interactions and the benefits of working in groups to solve problems as a means to learning and knowledge acquisition. Advances in Web technologies over the last decade (the so called Web 2.0) have paralleled these changes and have enabled us to build tools to support and integrate many kinds of collaboration and learning in networks. Such tools have been retrofitted to existing VLEs. This presentation argues that the current generation of Virtual Leaning Environments is no longer fit for purpose; they embody educational processes that promulgate ineffective/inappropriate didactic methods, and do not complement the expectations or approaches to learning taken by Generation Y learners. Nor do they prepare students for using the tools and working methods that will be required in the increasingly virtualworkplace. Personal learning environments put the onus on the learner to take responsibility, not only for their learning but also how they go about that learning and the tools that they use. Such self-determination and choice is ideal in a self directed or informal learning scenario, but how can institutions provide such an experience for groups of learners? Is this even possible? A number of Universities are attempting to deploy personal (personalised and personalisable) rich learning environments in an attempt to scaffold their learners (and teachers?) to become independent users of authentic tools to support their lifelong learning beyond the university. This talk will examine the some of these environments, and the part played by Web 2.0, linked data and cloud computing.





2011

CLOUD COMPUTING IN EDUCATION - The Intersection of Challenges and Opportunities



Ivan  Ivanov
SUNY Empire State College
United States


In the last few years, in spite of concerns about the hype, cloud computing has expanded steadily both horizontally - across industries, and vertically - in organizations' technology stacks. Most technologies that enable cloud services existed prior to cloud computing's existence, although these days they rejuvenate, evolve and stimulate the computational ecosystem transformations. Actually the radical change for organizations is in rethinking and reengineering their traditional IT resources advancing them with cloud architectures and implementing services based on cloud computing delivery models. The change is underway on a large scale: from vendors and developers to providers and customers, and the key issues of "cloudiness" are not only in economics and management, but in provisioning, interoperability and security of the integrated services. The Cloud Computing phenomenon likewise creates exciting challenges and opportunities for the entire educational system. For faculty, students, administration and IT professionals it is a thrilling journey driven by many agendas - cost cutting, delivering dynamic mobile and interactive computational services, utilizing and leveraging integrated IT infrastructures and systems. This talk will explore the impact of cloud computing on the educational socio-technical system and will provide the author's experience in strategizing and utilizing cloud-based applications and services.




COMPUTER EDUCATION JOURNALS - Leading or Following Research Trends



Rachelle Heller
The George Washington University
United States


What is the role of a peer- reviewed journal? Is it to promote scientific inquiry? Is it to serve as an historical repository of a scientific field? Is it an organ of a professional society? Is it to promote an individual scientist by expanding his or her vitae? Is it to observe the flow and direction of research or is it to help direct a research agenda? A peer-reviewed journal provides a venue for research that demonstrates (or refutes) the efficacy of computer-supported education - with its shifting emphasis to online education, hybrid education, and the use of new technologies. But, are the journals being flooded with too many papers, many incremental rewrites of previous work? Are reviewers too overworked to provide the depth of analysis necessary to sort the wheat from the chaff, the real from the hype, especially in terms of what actually improves learning? Where do the responsibilities lie? This talk with address these themes in general and draw specific examples from the speaker's nearly 20 years as co-editor of Computers & Education, an International Journal.




WHY, WHAT AND HOW ARE WE DOING OUR RESEARCH?



Lauri Malmi
Aalto University School of Science and Technology
Finland


Research in educational technology has a long history. There is a huge body of literature presenting and evaluating various ICT based tools, computerized learning environments, teaching methodologies and educational practices. In this talk I wish to take a look at the research process itself. I will consider some of the literature from several perspectives. What kind of general goals do the published research papers have? Which pedagogical aspects are considered? How is the research building on theories and results from other fields of science? What kind of research approaches and methods are being used? What kind of data is used to support the claims? Based on the findings I draw some conclusions and suggestions for the research community.




AUGMENTED KNOWLEDGE COMMUNICATION SPACES



Friedrich Hesse
Knowledge Media Research Center
Germany


In the era of the information society and globalization, Computer-Supported Collaboration (CSC) in virtual groups is becoming increasingly important, although it still involves interaction problems and is not really efficient enough. These problems occur mostly because participants in CSC scenarios are not adequately informed about the expertise or dispositions of the others. However, by using certain CSC techniques one can augment the knowledge communication space and thus make the exchange of knowledge more efficient. In my talk I will present such innovative approaches for tackling the interaction problems of CSC in virtual groups. These CSC techniques aim at making group members aware of their collaborators dispositions and/or their knowledge. What is delivered by the technology can be seen as awareness, and the concrete technological application can be seen as an awareness tool. Awareness tools can implicitly offer/demand/afford directions for how to process input and behave accordingly (social navigation), or the tools can lead to reflection about one's own processes and behaviour. In both cases no explicit recommendations about how to proceed are given. Because the content of communication is personal knowledge, the nature of this content is also dependent on processes of social comparison. This means it has to be taken into account that participants might under certain conditions be inclined to withhold their knowledge and not be willing to share. To enhance awareness is considered to be a crucial aspect in a communication scenario, when one is interested in improving participants' interaction without having to have the way they interact be prescribed.





2010

DESKTOP TO LAPTOP TO CLOUD - Challenges for Teaching and for Administration



Michael Gould
ESRI
United States


Teaching with information technology is challenging for economic reasons but also because of the rapid pace of technological evolution. The traditional computer laboratory is giving way to students carrying laptops, and locally installed software applications are giving way to cloud services. This evolution changes more than simply the delivery method; it changes the nature of what is being taught, how, and even by whom. Administration of software licenses and hardware is also affected. Examples are taken from our experience over the past decades with students at all levels using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software in class, and we look at what we think the future holds.




COMPUTATIONAL THINKING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM - The Power and the Peril



Robert  M. Panoff
The Shodor Education Foundation
United States


Students and faculty at all education levels are clearly spending much more of their days interacting with computing and communication tools than with each other. Is this good? Are all uses of technology in education helpful, and if not, how does one separate the benefits from the burdens? We will explore how technology enables dynamic representation in the sciences, arts, and humanities, giving us the opportunity to be more fully human as we seek new knowledge in service to society. Moving "beyond PowerPointless-ness," we have the opportunity to demonstrate that computing really matters. Computing "matters" because quantitative reasoning, computational thinking, and multiscale modeling are the intellectual "heart and soul" of 21st Century science and therefore are the essential skills of the 21st Century workforce. Computing "matters" because we can apply the power of interactive computing to reach a deeper understanding and of math and science and their role in understanding the world. We will explore a transformation in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) education, supported by interactive computing resources, promoting a dynamic encounter with our world through guided discovery. A world-class education requires world-class resources, and all math and science teachers should be able to bring interactive modeling environments to their own teaching practice. We will explore a variety of free and low-cost sources for modeling tools from the Computational Science Education Reference Desk, a pathway project of the U.S. National Science Digital Library (http://www.nsdl.org ).




"HOW MUCH TECHNOLOGY?" IS THE QUESTION



Hermann Maurer
Graz University of Technology
Austria


In this talk I will use examples of novel ideas and developments to show the strong convergence of cell phones and PCs: there are a number of technologies that overcome the small screen-size of cell phones and their small keyboards that are not acceptable for serious typing. I will show some pictures and clips from labs working to resolve this dilemma. I will then explain how much this will change society and education: we will have with us a permanent powerful assistant. This brings both great benefits and great dangers. I will also address the issue whether large amounts of information help us for the better or rather brainwash us and influence our decision making in a negative way, again by showing examples that I hope will surprise the audience. I will then argue that how much one tries to use modern communication systems, one does not react the same way when compared to “digital natives” that have grown up in such new environments. I will report on two surprising recent experiments that seem to prove this point conclusively. Finally, I will ask the heretic question “How much technology do we need to be happy?” … and what are the consequences of the answer that I will give.





2009

LEARNING ISSUES IN OPEN-ENDED GROUP PROJECTS



Mats Daniels
Uppsala University
Sweden


Learning environments based on open-ended group projects (OEGPs) have the potential to meet complex learning goals such as professional and personal development, as well as more traditional subject related goals. OEGPs offer a setting in which a holistic approach to what the students should learn. There are however several pitfalls to pay attention to. Theories related to learning in OEGPs and practical examples will be presented in an attempt to promote an enlightened use of OEGPs in our education through raising awareness of the pros and cons of the method.




INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND EDUCATIONAL EMPOWERMENT - A Humanistic Perspective



Thao Le
University of Tasmania
Australia


In many industrialized societies, life has changed drastically due to the permeation of information technologies in many aspects of society such as business, government, commerce, education as well as daily activities. We have been consciously or unconsciously acculturated into a computer-based social discourse. While some of us are still marveled at the magical power that information technologies have offered, others may take it for granted that due to the inevitable permeation of information technologies, we have to accept its impacts on our lives. The proliferation of software products and computer-based projects showing their positive impacts on teaching and learning is like constant tidal waves. Information technologies are rapidly growing at such a fast speed that what we consider as ‘current development’ will soon become outdated. Computer educational software depends heavily on hardware. A new development in hardware can trigger new directions in software development and implementation and vice versa. The real challenge for educators is to examine how computer software and hardware are used in a meaningful discourse to enhance children’s development, intellectually, emotionally and socially. In the context of educational evaluation, instead of focusing on traditional features for evaluating software such as screen design, navigation, text type, cost and user-friendliness, it is useful to employ the concept ‘metaphor’ as a basis on which we examine the role of computer in teaching and learning. How computer is viewed and valued in education depends greatly on the theoretical perspectives of the beholders. In other words, different computer metaphors reveal different views and attitudes of the users and the concept ‘computer-assisted learning’ does not adequately capture. From a humanistic perspective, technology is a product of scientific knowledge in a human world which is culturally diversified. Our worldview, self-concept and identity belong to the human world. Technology should be used to change the way we think of ourselves in relation to other human beings and the land on which we live. It raises the issues of environmental awarenes , international understanding, and human co-existent as world citizens. Technology permeates many aspects of society that it affects the quality of life both positively and negatively. The quality of life is not just about goods and services, but fundamentally it is about mindfulness. One of the big challenges in computer supported education is the response to the question: How should computer technology be used to enhance learners in terms of intellectual, social and emotional development? This challenge shifts our attention from the emphasis on a narrow context of academic learning to humanistic learning discourse.




NEW FRONTIERS IN COMPUTER SUPPORTED EDUCATION



Itiel Dror
University College London
United Kingdom


Education is not only about acquiring information and knowledge, but also (and mainly) about whether and how these are remembered and used. To understand education and learning and how technology can affect it, is less about what is taught and what technology is used, and much more about what learners learn: If you want people to learn using learning technology, you need first to understand how they learn. In this keynote talk Itiel Dror will illustrate that when you know what learning is all about, then seemingly small differences in the way learning materials are designed and delivered can make a huge difference to their effectiveness. The full potential of technology enhanced learning depends crucially on those involved having an understanding of what learning is all about, and the know-how to apply it in practice. Itiel’s paper "Technology Enhanced Learning: The good, the bad, and the ugly" introduces some of this general approach, and a specific illustration of it can be seen in his paper "Helping the cognitive system learn: exaggerating distinctiveness and uniqueness". These and other papers can be downloaded from: http://cognitiveconsultantsinternational.com/training.htm




QUALITY POLICIES CONFORMED WITH ABET IN A SPANISH ENGINEERING SCHOOL



Edmundo Tovar
Madrid Polytechnic University
Spain


The European Higher Education Area is an example of diversity of political systems, higher education systems, socio-cultural and educational traditions, languages, aspirations and expectations. In the light of this diversity and variety, technical universities set its face to develop their internal quality assurance systems according to the European standards and the guidelines, focusing more on what should be done than how they should be achieved, but also to different factors and sources. This presentation explains the definition of quality policies in a Spanish Engineering school, including engineering accreditation, programs, funding programs or improvement.




INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES SUPPORTING LEARNING



Manuel Castro Gil
National University for Distance Education
Spain


The massive, simultaneous redesign of all degrees in European Higher Education Area presents daunting challenges but also offers unprecedented opportunities. All degrees must be simultaneously redesigned; synergies among them can be effectively exploited, thus encouraging the re-utilization oriented approaches discussed in this paper (LCMS, standards like LOM, Dublin Corem QTI, IMS, SCORM, etc.). On the other hand, shifting the unit of academic measurement to student hours (through the ECTS) facilitates the seamless combination of face-to-face, distance and blended learning in academic degrees.




HOMO ZAPPIENS, LEARNING IN A DIGITAL AGE



Wim  Veen
Delft University of Technology
Netherlands


Nowadays’ students have grown up with technology as a commodity for playing, communication, information and for learning. Many of them act within virtual environments and have developed virtual identities as an extension of self (Second Life, WOW, Facebook, Plaxo, Plazes, Twitter, Dopplr etc.) Wim Veen argues that their online behavior and their virtual presence in cyber space have fostered the development of competencies that former generations could only do within a restricted realm of physical presence. For this generation, called Homo Zappiens, scarcity of reaching out, communications and resources has vanished to a large extent; Homo Zappiens lives in human and technical networks that provide new opportunities to act experiment and learn. Homo Zappiens learns within social networks where content is distributed and discontinuous. As a consequence, future learning will be based on concepts of aggregation, externalization, collective knowledge creation and immersion. How do these uses of technologies go in parallel with developments in businesses, schools and society? How do prepare companies for these upcoming changes? And how relations between governmental authorities and citizens are going to change? In times of uncertainty and change the educational sector seems to react regressively: ‘back to the past’. But schools have always been part of a socio-economic system, so looking away from what is happening in the outside world is not an option. If change is the only certainty for future, how technology can help to support change? A bunch of questions to be answered during the conference.





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